Whenever a Republican president takes a position on human rights that differs from Progressive-liberal dogma, the media reacts with outrage.  But regardless of whether the policies of any one president are just or unjust, the Progressive-liberal position on human rights is not supported by history or logic.

From the very beginning, human rights have been defined as natural rights in the United States.

In 1774, while meeting at the First Continental Congress, representatives from the colonies, including future president George Washington, explained that despite the oppressive acts of the British government, the colonists still had the rights to life, liberty, and property under natural law.

Then in 1776, while meeting at the Second Continental Congress, representatives from the colonies, including future president Thomas Jefferson, based the Declaration of Independence on natural rights, and proclaimed that securing these rights is the purpose of government.

Natural rights have four main features:

  • They are universal (they apply to everyone, everywhere);
  • They are unchanging (they stay the same, from generation to generation);
  • They are unalienable (they cannot be taken away by a government);
  • they are negative (they are the right to not be killed, the right to not be physically restrained, the right to not be robbed, and so on).

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